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“There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.”
Maya Angelou

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Danielle Dickens, PhD.

Associate Professor of Psychology 
Spelman College, Atlanta GA

 

Dr. Danielle Dickens received her bachelor’s degree in psychology from Spelman College, and her master’s and doctorate degrees in applied social and health psychology from Colorado State University. Dr. Dickens is most interested in examining how Black women experience discrimination, the utilization of identity shifting as a coping strategy, and the benefits and costs of identity shifting on Black women’s mental and physical health. In her second line of research, Dickens examines the social-psychological determinants of academic and career development of Black women. She is a recipient of the 2019 American Psychological Association (APA) Division 35 Mary Roth Walsh Teaching the Psychology of Women Award and the 2020 APA Division 35 Section 1 Psychology of Black Women Mentorship Early Career Award.

More about Danielle Dickens

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Dionne Stephens, PhD.
Professor of Psychology
Florida International University, Miami FL

 

Dr. Dionne Stephens earned her doctoral degree in Human Development from The University of Georgia. A social justice focused health inequities scholar, she is specifically interested in identifying scultural and contextual factors influencing BIPOC populations’ constructions of sexual health, and how these influence decision making processes. Dionne has been widely recognized for her research through receipt of various awards, including the American Psychological Association’s (APA) Mid-Career Award for Multicultural Psychology, APA Division 35: Psychology of Black Women’s Foremothers' Excellence in Mentorship,  National Institute for Health’s (NIH) Fogarty Global Health Equity Scholars’ Faculty Fellowship, and the National Institute for Teaching & Mentoring Faculty Mentor of the Year.

More about Dionne Stephens

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